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What’s Inside Wiring Matters – Issue 67 – September 2017

Let’s take a look at whats inside the latest edition of the IET Wiring Matters magazine (Issue 67 – September 2017)

The Impact of the 18th edition (BS 7671:2018)

In this article, Geoff Cronshaw looks at some of the proposed changes in the DPC (draft for public comment) for electrical installations, focusing on Section 704, Section 708, and Section 721.

Electrical qualifications

For some, the electrical industry might seem like a bit of a minefield when trying to assess the skill and capability of a person who is carrying out electrical work in the UK. In this article, Steven Devine sheds some light on the qualifications (past and present) that persons may have, what they all mean.

Double success for JIB Apprentice Exchange

Two electrical apprentices have been named as the lucky winners of the Joint Industry Board (JIB) Apprentice Exchange Programme and will travel to Australia later this year to spend six weeks working ‘down under’. The IET would like to extend their congratulations to Joshua Horton of RB Emerson Group Ltd and George Stickings of T Clarke plc, who were chosen as the stand-out candidates following a challenging selection and interview process.



Statutory and non-statutory documents applicable to the electrical industry

Do you have any responsibility for the installation, maintenance and/or upkeep of the fixed wiring or portable appliances at work? If so, a time will come – if it hasn’t already – when you will need to know how to stay on the right side of the law. So, do you know the difference between which legislation has to be complied with and which documentation you can rely on to help comply with it? If not, Gary Gundry, electrical safety specialist, trainer and technical consultant, is here to help.

The store-age: the start of smarter energy consumption

Dr Andrew Crossland MIET discusses changes in the installation notification process for energy storage systems and how flexibility-technologies, including energy storage, are fast impacting how we consume energy.

You can read the full story’s online here

 

Schneider Electric Agrees To Buy Aveva

French industrial group Schneider Electric has agreed a takeover of Aveva a UK engineering software developer, in a deal worth more than £3bn.

Shares in Aveva surged almost 25% in early trading on Tuesday 5th September, after the UK engineering group announced plans to merge with the software division of French giant Schneider Electric.

The deal, which will create a company worth approximately £3bn and will be completed by the end of 2017, is a case of third time lucky, as over the last three years Schneider has twice tried to merge with Aveva.

“I believe in this case, in the third period, things are different,” Jean-Pascal Tricoire, Schneider Electric’s CEO and Chairman told CNBC.

Schneider Electric is expected to take a 60 percent stake in the enlarged group’s stock under the terms of this deal, with the combination being classified a reverse takeover, the companies added. The enlarged Aveva Group stock is expected to remain listed on the London Stock Exchange.

Are We Ready To Switch To Electric Cars

Electric cars are on the way, but are we ready ? If they take off like the government suggests, more people will need electric charging points installed and that is a bonus for the electrical industry.

The government recently announced plans to end the sale of petrol and diesel cars by 2040, which is part of a long-term plan to tackle air pollution. Emissions from vehicles contribute to pollution and climate change, as well as harming our health. As the UK’s plan for this notes: “Although air pollution has improved, it still poses an urgent health problem”.

Nearly all of the cars on our roads are diesel or petrol

There were 30.8 million licensed cars on the roads in Great Britain in 2016. This has risen by nearly 10 million since 1994.

In 2016, diesel cars accounted for 39.1% of licensed cars on our roads, up from just 7.4% in 1994. Meanwhile, petrol cars accounted for 59.7% of all licensed cars in 2016, down from 92.6% in 1994.

The rise in the sale of diesel cars in recent years is linked to a tax cut on diesel cars and a reduced vehicle tax on all cars with low carbon dioxide emissions, which encouraged people to trade their petrol cars for diesel vehicles.

There has been an increase in the number of alternative fuel vehicles, which includes electric cars, illustrating some willingness for consumers to adapt to new technologies. However, they still make up a tiny percentage (1.2%) of all licensed cars on the road today.



Motorists pay the bulk of environmental taxes

Environmental tax accounts for 7.2% of all taxes and social contributions to government. It includes transport, energy, pollution and resource taxes.

Government revenue from environmental taxes reached £47.6 billion in 2016. Revenue from the taxes that affect motorists – indirect taxes like the tax on fuel, and direct taxes like vehicle tax – make up a high proportion of the overall revenue from environmental taxes.

Few people are thinking about buying an electric car

Just 5% of adults aged 16 and over had thought about buying an electric car or van in 2016. Meanwhile, over half (55%) reported they had not thought about buying an electric car or van. Some 16% said they considered it, but decided not to buy one just yet.

The most significant barrier to buying an electric car, for many people, was related to the battery. This included the perceived lack of charging stations, and concerns that they won’t be able to recharge when they need to, or that the battery is limited to a distance that is too short.

The advent of new technologies, which can increase battery capacity and therefore the distance vehicles can travel on one charge, may convince motorists that electric is a more attractive option.

Story via gov.uk

17th Edition – Installing Consumer Units

We have found a useful guide published by Hager regarding installing consumer units.

This guide will help you understand the Wiring Regulations and current Building Regulations, providing the necessary facts to construct compliant installations including Consumer Units.

The PDF can be found here – http://www.hager.co.uk/files/download/0/2802_1/0/Hager%20Guide%20to%2017th%20Edition%20Consumer%20Units.pdf 

Getting Smart Energy Technology Into Homes And Businesses

As part of the Industrial Strategy the Government and Ofgem set out plans to upgrade the energy system, putting consumers in control.  Here is the plans for smart energy :-

A plan to give homes and businesses more control over their energy use and support innovative new technologies, as part of the Industrial Strategy, was set out by Business and Energy Secretary Greg Clark today (24 July 2017).

The innovative plan will transform how homes and businesses store and use energy. It will deliver a smarter, more flexible energy system by removing barriers to smart and battery technology, reducing costs for consumers. The report, ‘Upgrading our energy system’ describes how the UK energy system is changing and how it can ensure economic benefits for businesses and households. Over a quarter of the UK’s electricity is being generated through renewables such as wind and solar, much of it located close to homes and businesses. New technologies that help store and manage energy are emerging and the costs are falling.

These changes provide an opportunity to create new businesses and jobs in the UK. At the same time new smart technologies like smart meters – and appliances you can control from your mobile phone – along with other improvements to manage the energy system will help the country save up to £40 billion on energy costs over decades to come.

Business and Energy Secretary Greg Clark said:

Upgrading our energy system to make sure it is fit for the future is a key part of our Industrial Strategy. A smarter energy system will create opportunities to reduce energy costs, increase productivity and put UK businesses in a leading position to export smart energy technology and services to the rest of the world.

By rolling out smart meters, enabling suppliers to offer lower tariffs and making it easier for firms to develop smart appliances and gadgets, the plan will help consumers use energy when it is cheapest or get rewarded for returning it to the grid when it is needed.



The plan also recognises the role that energy storage can play in a smart energy grid and the opportunities presented by falling costs of battery technologies designed to store surplus energy. To allow industry to exploit these new technologies government and Ofgem have committed to removing barriers to the introduction of this technology into our power network.

Andrew Wright, Senior Partner, Energy Systems, Ofgem, said:

The way we are generating and using energy in Britain is changing rapidly. Today’s plan sets out how Ofgem, government and the industry will work together to modernise the energy system and make sure consumers get the benefits of the changes.

We want to open the door to new technologies and services so that they can help to reduce bills for consumers in the long term. It is vital that we get the changes in place as there is potential for a smarter system to save consumers billions between now and 2050.

The plan will also make it easier for new businesses to help customers that are interested in reducing, or increasing, their energy use at certain times, which can help balance the calls on the electricity network.

As part of the Industrial Strategy, the government has committed to modernising the UK’s energy system and developing a business environment where new entrants to the market can compete. This will also allow industry to develop innovative new products and services, creating thousands of jobs.

Chairman of the National Infrastructure Commission Lord Adonis said:

Upgrading our energy systems is vital if we are to have clean, affordable and secure supply for the long-term and meet our targets for reducing carbon emissions.

This plan is a clear step forward, and was one of the 12 key infrastructure decisions we said needed to be made as a matter of urgency. I’m particularly pleased that many of the 29 points listed today directly follow recommendations in our Smart Power report.

Our study demonstrated the revolution our energy sector is going through, and the real benefits we can get from that in terms of greater efficiency, flexibility and value for money for customers. The measures announced today will lead to exciting innovations in the industry to help make that happen.

The full implementation of the plan to move to a smarter energy system alongside other changes could help save the country up to £40 billion over the coming decades, according to research conducted for BEIS by Imperial College and the Carbon Trust..

Case study

British company Moixa offers residential battery systems which can help manage energy demands across the electricity network, make better use of energy generated by rooftop solar panels, and enable suppliers to reward consumers who charge their batteries during periods of low demand, when prices are lower. These systems have been deployed in nearly 1,000 homes across the UK, and Moixa calculate that they could help consumers save up to 60% on their electricity bills.

Simon Daniel, CEO of Moixa Energy Holdings said:

Moixa welcomes this plan which recognises the central importance of energy storage in upgrading the UK Energy System – and the potential to save £40 billion off future customer bills. The regulatory improvements proposed and Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund will help storage providers like Moixa participate better in energy markets, and enable our Utility partners to deliver smart tariffs to customers. The actions will make the UK a global leader for new smart technologies and accelerate the transition to a cost-effective, resilient and low carbon energy system.